Classes

Contemporary Issues in African Societies (Soc/Afr Studies 354, Princeton)

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

This course approaches contemporary African issues through the lens of population studies. What theories explain the recent fertility declines observed in so much of the developing world, and why have some African countries failed to adhere to that path? What traits are characteristic of African households today, and how were present-day family relations shaped by pre-colonial norms?

Environment and Migration (Soc 337/Env 336, Princeton)

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

Environmental conditions can push and pull populations to new locations. A volcanic eruption may have caused the earliest migrants to emigrate from Africa, herds of big game may have guided nomadic humans to the Americas, and strained food supplies may have led to the inhabitation of Polynesia. In more recent history, the Irish Potato Famine drove migrants across the Atlantic, and the Dust Bowl of the 1920s pushed farmers to move westward across the United States.

Economic Demography (Demog/Econ C175, UC Berkeley)

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2015

This course examines various economic and social causes and consequences of population change in an international context. The consequences studied will include the economic impact of immigrants on US workers and taxpayers, the growing pension burden as populations age, the effect of population growth on economic growth, and environmental consequences of population growth. The course will also examine the economic causes of demographic behavior including fertility, marriage, and labor supply.

Introduction to Quantitative Social Sciences (Soc 7, UC Berkeley)

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2015

There are many facets of society that can be effectively understood quantitatively. There are even those facets that can only be understood quantitatively. This course will provide students with a set of skills to understand, evaluate, use, and produce quantitative data about the social world. It is intended specifically for social science majors, and focuses on social science questions. You do not need a strong mathematical, statistical, or computing background to succeed in this course.