Courses Taught

ART 450 / FRE 408: Self and Society in 19th-Century French Painting

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

The 19th century saw the rise of modern “individualism,” in the arts no less than in other areas of society. This seminar will investigate how this turn towards the self was made manifest in French painting, while also attending to the ways artists resisted isolation and narcissism in their work. By examining the friction between forms of individualism, intersubjectivity, and collectivity in major examples of French painting, the course aims to illuminate 19th-century views of artistic identity, sociability, group dynamics, and the individual self...

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ART 561 / ENG 549 / FRE 561: Painting and Literature in 19th Century France and England

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

Co-taught with Deborah Nord.

This course explores the dynamic interplay between painting, poetry, and fiction in nineteenth-century France and England. Our focus is twofold: painters and paintings as protagonists in novels and short stories (Balzac, C. Brontë, Dickens, Eliot, James, Huysmans, Maupassant, Wilde, and Zola); and paintings (Degas, Delacroix, Millais, Holman Hunt, Morris, Sargent, Waterhouse) inspired by literature. Themes will include problems of narrative, translation, and illustration; changing theories of the relative strengths of painting and literature as...

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ART 212: Neoclassicism to Post-Impressionism

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

This course will survey the history of European art in the long 19th century (from the late 18th century to the dawn of the 20th), focusing primarily on painting and sculpture. This is a rich and fascinating period of art-making as well as cultural and technological transformation – a period during which political instability, industrialization, imperialism, and the growth of popular culture had an enormous impact on the production, style, and presentation of art. Old systems of patronage and institutional control over artists...

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ART 564: Word & Image in the 19th Century

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2018

For Gotthold E. Lessing, writing in 1766, the “intrusion of the painter into the domain of the poet” was in poor taste (Laokoon). Many nineteenth-century artists and writers disagreed. This seminar will explore the fluid, ever-shifting relationship between word and image in nineteenth-century French and British art and literature, with a particular focus on problems of illustration and interpretation. The mid- to late-nineteenth century witnessed dramatic changes in the collaborative possibilities between artists and writers as well as in established hierarchies of word-image...

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ART 400: Junior Seminar (Theories & Methods)

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2017

The Junior Seminar is an introduction to the myriad subjects, methods, and strategies of art history.  The course examines the different kinds of evidence and methodological tools that have been used to identify, explain, and contextualize works of art and as well as other kinds of objects, artifacts, and cultural phenomena.  In other words, this seminar considers what art historians do, and how and why they do it.  The Junior Seminar runs in conjunction with the writing of the fall semester Junior Independent Work (the Junior Paper).

ART 345 / HUM 345: Art & Knowledge in the 19th Century

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

Co-taught with Rachael DeLue.

The 19th century in Europe and America saw the rise and fall of empires and unprecedented innovation in industry, technology, science, and the arts. Through a series of topics, including history, science, medicine, perception, and time, this course considers how intellectual revolutions in diverse disciplines, such as biology and philosophy, and the invention of new fields of knowledge, such as ethnography and psychology, fundamentally shaped art-making. Devoted equally to examining historical material and the modes of seeing and knowing that...

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ART 564: Manet and the Methods of Art History

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2016

This seminar will focus on the work of a single artist, Édouard Manet (1832-1883), often hailed as the originator of modernist painting. Because of this privileged status he has been written about repeatedly and from a broad range of methodological perspectives, from Marxist to psychoanalytic, formalist to feminist, and beyond. This seminar will investigate those different approaches and their relationship to each other, as well as think about their adequacy and inadequacy to the art they try to understand. Repeated and close looking at Manet’s paintings will be at the heart of the...

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ART 450 / FRE 408: Impressionism and Post-Impressionism - New Approaches

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

This course will consider a range of recent scholarship – both from the academy and museums – that has shifted understandings of impressionist and post-impressionist painting. By reading these texts against canonical ones, as well as indispensable primary sources, students will gain a deep and critical perspective on the state of the field. Special attention will be paid to methodology and changing approaches to the blockbuster exhibition. Artists discussed will include Cézanne, Degas, Cassatt, Monet, Pissarro, and Seurat. Topics will include individuality...

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ART 564: Fin-de-siècle France: Painting, Print Culture, Film

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2011
This seminar will investigate the flux of artistic media in fin-de-siècle France, focusing on various instances in which artists struggled to redefine the purposes and material parameters of the pictorial arts. Topics will include: efforts to redefine painting after Impressionism; art’s engagement with crowd psychology, theater, and the rise of the mass press; interiority and radical politics as central themes of avant-garde art; modernism and the decorative; Wagnerism; the artist’s book and the transformation of print culture; art’s relationship to spectacle and mass... Read more about ART 564: Fin-de-siècle France: Painting, Print Culture, Film

ART 101: Introduction to the History of Art: Renaissance to Contemporary

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2010
ART 101 provides an introduction to the history of art from the late Middle Ages to the present day as well as an introduction to the discipline of art history. It is not a comprehensive survey, but presents a sampling of artworks – painting, sculpture, architecture, photography and prints – and artistic practices from diverse historical periods, regions, and cultures. The course balances this vast historical horizon with close attention to individual works of art, while also considering the variety of ways in which art historians and other modern observers approach and...

ART 343 / WOM 345: Modernism and Masculinity

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2009

This course maps representations of masculinity in nineteenth-century art. Beginning with “the great masculine renunciation” and the rise of the male bourgeois and ending with the years leading up to World War I, we will consider seriously the idea – put forth by several art historians in recent years – that the social and psychological “crisis of masculinity” contributed to the formal innovations and thematic concerns of modernism in the visual arts. Topics will be wide-ranging and will include theories of masculinity, portraiture, artistic...

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ART 564: Picturing the Crowd, ca. 1848-1914

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2008

This seminar will focus on representations of the crowd in European art, c. 1848-1914, and examine them in light of shifting notions of individuality and collectivity in contemporary thought. Our readings will be wide-ranging and interdisciplinary, including literature, philosophy, sociology, psychoanalysis, cultural history, and, of course, art history. In particular, the emergence of crowd psychology in late nineteenth-century France and its subsequent theoretical permutations will underlie our visual investigation, which will focus on several artists’ interest in crowd...

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