Greg is a political theorist and intellectual historian. His research focuses on the history of modern political thought, especially in Britain and France, and on the lessons that can be drawn from that history for contemporary debates in political philosophy.

Recently, his primary interests have concerned the relationship between ideas of democracy, liberalism, and representative government. He has also addressed, among other subjects: toleration and freedom of speech; deliberative democracy and theories of deliberation more broadly; the history of electoral systems; the development of ideas about political parties; Enlightenment political philosophy; the history of utilitarianism; the thought of John Stuart Mill and its reception; and modern French political theory.

His book Parliament the Mirror of the Nation: Representation, Deliberation, and Democracy in Victorian Britain was released by Cambridge University Press in the spring of 2019. In addition, he has published in a number of journals in political theory and the history of political thought.

Greg joined Princeton's faculty in the fall of 2018. He holds a BA in English literature from the University of Chicago and a PhD in political science from Harvard University. He has also been a fellow of Jesus College, University of Cambridge.

His CV is available here.