Welcome to the Cristea Lab:

Virology meets proteomics:  defining the spatiotemporal interplay between virus and host

 

Our laboratory is poised at the interface of virology and proteomics, and aims to understand the mechanisms that control the fate of cells under invasion by pathogens. We apply multidisciplinary approaches to study the dynamic relationships between virus and host, and work to define both cellular defense mechanisms and viral manipulations that inhibit or hijack host cell processes. By integrating mass spectrometry-based proteomics with molecular virology, microscopy, and bioinformatics, we continue to develop comprehensive proteomics-based approaches for characterizing virus-host interplay. We are currently exploring several areas of interest:

 

  • Dynamic regulation of host-virus protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions during the progression of an infection

  • Initiation and propagation of intrinsic and innate immune responses following infection with nuclear-replicating herpesviruses

  • Mechanisms of sensing of pathogenic DNA within the nuclei of infected cells

  • Roles and regulation of human deacetylases (histone deacetylases - HDACs and sirtuins - SIRTs) during viral infections

  • Global remodeling of the subcellular landscape and cellular organelles as viral infection progresses

  • The subcellular temporal and spatial kinetics of host and viral proteomes

  • Developing targeted and large-scale proteomic tools for quantifying proteins, identifying protein interactions, determining the specificity of interactions, defining distinct protein complexes, and measuring the relative stability of interactions

 

LEARN ABOUT OUR RESEARCH