Research/Projects

Current Projects

Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment: The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) is the highest energy collider ever constructed. It consists of two counter-circulating proton beams made to interact in four locations around a 17 mile ring straddling the border between Switzerland and France. The goal of the LHC is to probe the basic building blocks of matter and their interactions. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment sits at one of the four interaction regions of the LHC to observe the products of the proton-proton collisions. CMS and its sister experiment Atlas have already produced exciting results such as the discovery of the Higgs Boson in 2012, leading to the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics. They are now embarking on an evolving series of upgrades and data taking periods over the next 15 years to realize the full scientific potential of this machine. CMS is a general purpose physics detector capable of answering a wide variety of physics questions, amongst them: What is the dark matter which pervades the universe? Does space-time have additional symmetries or extend beyond the 3 spatial dimensions we know? What is the mechanism stabilizing the Higgs mass from enormous quantum corrections? Are neutrinos, whose only SM interactions are weak, their own anti-particles? Can the theories of gravity and quantum mechanics be reconciled?
Website: http://cms.web.cern.ch

Institute for Research and Innovation in Software for High Energy Physics (IRIS-HEP): The objective of the IRIS-HEP project is to develop the next generation software tools which will allow the HEP community to meet the significant data challenges of the planned High Luminosity upgrade of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other HEP facilities in the 2020s. 
Project Website: http://iris-hep.org

Data Intensive Analysis for High Energy Physics (DIANA/HEP): The primary goal of DIANA/HEP is to develop state-of-the-art software tools for experiments which acquire, reduce, and analyze petabytes of data. Improving performance, interoperability, and collaborative tools through modifications and additions to ROOT and other software packages broadly used by the HEP community will allow us to more fully exploit the data being acquired at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other facilities.
Project Website: http://diana-hep.org

Parallel Kalman Filter Tracking: The Parallel Kalman Filter Tracking project aims to develop charged particle track reconstruction algorithms based on the Kalman Filter that are fully vectorized and parallelized for use in a collider experiment. These will be usable with parallel processor architectures such as Intel's Xeon Phi and GPUs, but yet maintain and extend the physics performance required for the challenges for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) planned for the 2020s.
Project Website: http://trackreco.github.io

Framework for Integrated Research Software Training in High Energy Physics (FIRST-HEP): The FIRST-HEP project aims to develop a community framework for software training in order to prepare the scientific and engineering workforce needed for the computing challenges of high energy physics experiments. 
Project Website: http://first-hep.org/

HEP Software Foundation (HSF): The HEP Software Foundation (HSF) facilitates coordination and common efforts in high energy physics (HEP) software and computing internationally. In particular the HSF is working to develop a consensus roadmap for HEP Software and Computing R&D for the 2020s. More infomation about this can be found on the Community White Paper (CWP) page on the HSF site.
Website: http://hepsoftwarefoundation.org

Past Projects

Software Institute Conceptualization: The S2I2-HEP conceptualization project is creating a strategic plan for a possible NSF SI2-S2I2 software institute that would support the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN in the 2020s. The S2I2-HEP project is also working with the international HEP community and the HEP Software Foundation (HSF) to prepare a Community White Paper (CWP) describing a global roadmap for HEP Software and Computing R&D for the 2020s.
Project websitehttp://s2i2-hep.org

BaBar experiment: The BaBar experiment ran from 1999 until 2008 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in Menlo Park, CA. The experiment was located at the single interaction point of the PEP-II collider. PEP II was unique in that it collided electron and positron beams with asymmetric energies in order to produce particles with a net boost in the laboratory frame. It operated at an energy of 10.58GeV corresponding to Upsilon(4S) resonance. The primary physics goals of BaBar included the discovery of CP violation in the B-meson system and the general study of the physics accessible via the extremely large and clean data samples of B-mesons produced by a "B-factory" like PEP-II.
Project websitehttp://www-public.slac.stanford.edu/babar/