Books

Book
America, China, and the Struggle for World Order: Ideas, Traditions, Historical Legacies and Global Visions
America, China, and the Struggle for World Order: Ideas, Traditions, Historical Legacies and Global Visions. New York: Palgrave, 2015. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This book brings together twelve scholars–-six Americans and six Chinese-–to explore the ways America and China think about international order. What are the traditions, historical experiences, and ideologies that each country brings to debates about how the rules and institutions of the global system should be organized? The book addresses this question by pairing American and Chinese scholars in each chapter on specific topics related to global order: sovereignty, collective security, resources and the environment, trade, alliances, and monetary and financial relations. The book offers a vivid portrait of how the two countries come to global affairs from richly diverse and divergent starting points, and, in turn, how these factors affect current global dialogues.

Power, Order, and Change in World Politics
Power, Order, and Change in World Politics. Cambridge University Press, 2014. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Are there recurring historical dynamics and patterns that can help us understand today's power transitions and struggles over international order? What can we learn from the past? Are the cycles of rise and decline of power and international order set to continue? Robert Gilpin's classic work, War and Change in World Politics offers a sweeping and influential account of the rise and decline of leading states and the international orders they create. Now, some thirty years on, this volume brings together an outstanding collection of scholars to reflect on Gilpin's grand themes of power and change in world politics. The chapters engage with theoretical ideas that shape the way we think about great powers, with the latest literature on the changing US position in the global system, and with the challenges to the existing order that are being generated by China and other rising non-Western states.

  • Engages with current debates about the current transformation of the global political system, the changing position of the US and the rise of China
  • Showcases an eminent collection of scholars to reflect on central questions in international politics
  • Explores the enduring influence of the ideas of Robert Gilpin's classic book, War and Change in World Politics
Introduction to International Relations Enduring Questions and Contemporary Perspectives
Ikenberry, John G, Joseph Grieco, and Micahel Mastanduno. Introduction to International Relations Enduring Questions and Contemporary Perspectives. London: Palgrave, 2014. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Based on many years of teaching international relations courses and long-time collaboration between the authors, this major new text provides an authoritative introduction to international relations and to the long-standing questions that have engaged generations of IR scholars and students. Boxed features in each chapter help students navigate the 'levels of analysis', view the world from multiple perspectives, and 'make connections' between theory and practice, past and present, and aspirations and reality.

The Rise of Korean Leadership: Emerging Powers and Liberal International Order
Ikenberry, John G, and Mo Jongryn. The Rise of Korean Leadership: Emerging Powers and Liberal International Order. New York: Palgrave, 2013. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

South Korea has emerged as a new middle power playing a significant role in a wide range of important global issue areas and supporting liberal international order with its leadership diplomacy. The growing role played by new powers like Korea calls into question the prevailing view that global governance is polarized with emerging powers challenging the liberal international order established by the United States and its European allies after World War II. As the case of Korea shows, large developing countries like the BRICS are not the only emerging powers active in global governance. Newly developed or high income developing countries like South Korea, Turkey and Mexico are also active emerging powers, taking new initiatives, setting agendas and mediating conflicts between rival groups on the global stage. Because these high income developing countries have advanced under and benefited from the liberal international order, they see a great stake in its stability and show a willingness to protect it. "Liberal internationalist" developing countries are joining the expanding list of middle powers who contribute to the maintenance of liberal international order as niche players and system supporters.

Leviatano Liberale
Ikenberry, John G. Leviatano Liberale. Printed in Italy: De Agostini Scuola SpA- novara, 2013. Print.
Liberal Leviathan: The Origins, Crisis, and Transformation of the American World Order
Liberal Leviathan: The Origins, Crisis, and Transformation of the American World Order. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In the second half of the twentieth century, the United States engaged in the most ambitious and far-reaching liberal order building the world had yet seen. This liberal international order has been one of the most successful in history in providing security and prosperity to more people. But in the last decade, the American-led order has been troubled. Some argue that the Bush administration, with its war on terror, invasion of Iraq, and unilateral orientation, undermined this liberal order. Others argue that we are witnessing the end of the American era. Liberal Leviathan engages these debates.

G. John Ikenberry argues that the crisis that besets the American-led order is a crisis of authority. A political struggle has been ignited over the distribution of roles, rights, and authority within the liberal international order. But the deeper logic of liberal order remains alive and well. The forces that have triggered this crisis--the rise of non-Western states such as China, contested norms of sovereignty, and the deepening of economic and security interdependence--have resulted from the successful functioning and expansion of the postwar liberal order, not its breakdown. The liberal international order has encountered crises in the past and evolved as a result. It will do so again.

Ikenberry provides the most systematic statement yet about the theory and practice of the liberal international order, and a forceful message for policymakers, scholars, and general readers about why America must renegotiate its relationship with the rest of the world and pursue a more enlightened strategy--that of the liberal leviathan.

Liberal Order and Imperial Ambition: Essays on American Power and International Order
Liberal Order and Imperial Ambition: Essays on American Power and International Order. London: Polity Press, 2006. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This book of essays by the a leading figure in the new generation of American IR theorists explores the theoretical, historical, and foreign policy implications of American power and postwar order. The first part of the book focuses on the origins and foundational logic of America's post-war order-building project -- advancing ideas about `liberal hegemony' and `constitutional order'. The second part reflects on its evolving character and fate in the aftermath of the Cold War, the rise of unipolarity, and the post-9/11 threat of global terrorism. In this unique study of a superpower, Ikenberry argues that though the American world order is now in upheaval, in the end, the United States still has powerful incentive to sponsor and operate within a liberal rules-based system.

State Power and World Markets: The International Political Economy
State Power and World Markets: The International Political Economy. New York: Norton, 2003. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The first text to fully integrate economic principles with political analysis, State Power and World Markets provides a contemporary and comprehensive overview of the international political economy.

Professors Grieco and Ikenberry focus on the dynamic, reciprocal relationships between states and world markets, articulating the ways in which their interactions shape the world economy today. Intellectually challenging yet perfectly pitched to the undergraduate student, written by experts in the field, and combining the best of current political and economic theory, State Power and World Markets will enrich and further focus the undergraduate study of international relations.

After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars
After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The end of the Cold War was a "big bang" reminiscent of earlier moments after major wars, such as the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 and the end of the World Wars in 1919 and 1945. Here John Ikenberry asks the question, what do states that win wars do with their newfound power and how do they use it to build order? In examining the postwar settlements in modern history, he argues that powerful countries do seek to build stable and cooperative relations, but the type of order that emerges hinges on their ability to make commitments and restrain power.

The author explains that only with the spread of democracy in the twentieth century and the innovative use of international institutions--both linked to the emergence of the United States as a world power--has order been created that goes beyond balance of power politics to exhibit "constitutional" characteristics. The open character of the American polity and a web of multilateral institutions allow the United States to exercise strategic restraint and establish stable relations among the industrial democracies despite rapid shifts and extreme disparities in power.

Blending comparative politics with international relations, and history with theory, After Victory will be of interest to anyone concerned with the organization of world order, the role of institutions in world politics, and the lessons of past postwar settlements for today. It also speaks to today's debate over the ability of the United States to lead in an era of unipolar power.

The State
Ikenberry, John G, and John Hall. The State. Open University Press, 1989. Print.
Reasons of State: Oil Politics and the Capacities of American Government
Reasons of State: Oil Politics and the Capacities of American Government. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1988. Print.