Classes

FRS 139: Marx in the 21st Century

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

In this moment of unprecedented economic inequality and populist backlash, the time seems ripe for a return to Marx. But what would such a 21st-century Marxism look like? How would Marx understand (or not understand) Trump and Brexit? How might Marxist thought need to be updated in light of the present? What can Marxism learn from other forms of critical thought and activism that have emerged in the 20th and 21st centuries, especially those concerned with race and gender? Our seminar will examine the contemporary viability of Marx’s fundamental concepts—labor, exploitation, ideology,...

Read more about FRS 139: Marx in the 21st Century

FRS 134: The Way We Watch Now: "Quality Television," Critical Theory, and Contemporary Culture

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

In the last 15 or so years, the status of television within the broader cultural landscape has undergone a radical shift. In the wake of so-called "quality television" programs like The Wire and Breaking Bad, television — once derided as a form of mere entertainment — is now arguably the paradigmatic art form of contemporary US culture. In this sense, contemporary television (at least in its "quality" incarnation) is not only now grasped as "art," but as the very form of art to which we turn in order to understand best the present in which we live....

Read more about FRS 134: The Way We Watch Now: "Quality Television," Critical Theory, and Contemporary Culture

ECS 310/GER 335/COM 313/ENG 324: European Romanticism and War

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

Counter to received wisdom, it is in the Romantic period, not the 20th century, that war assumes its modern form as “total war.” In this seminar, we will thus examine how literary, philosophical, and artistic Romanticisms grapple with this new phenomenon. Subtopics include: war, media, and technology; landscape, spectatorship, and the sublime; the eventful and the ordinary; cosmopolitanism, nationalism, and the concept of Europe. Readings from Kant, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Barbauld, de Quincey, Clausewitz, Kleist, Stendhal, and Austen, along with recent scholarship on this topic (David Bell...

Read more about ECS 310/GER 335/COM 313/ENG 324: European Romanticism and War

ECS 395/COM 373/GER 395 Crises of European Subjectivity, 1945-1961

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2016

This course examines the crisis of European subjectivity in the wake of WWII and the Holocaust. Such a crisis implicates not merely the concepts of Europe and the subject, but the very concept of the concept and thus entails a transformation of thought itself. Topics include crises of the subject and the human; the question of technology; the Franco-German relation; the Cold War; decolonization; exile and emigration; essay, aphorism, and lecture as anti-systematic modes. We will do intensive readings of texts from seven authors: Theodor Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Maurice Blanchot, Paul Celan,...

Read more about ECS 395/COM 373/GER 395 Crises of European Subjectivity, 1945-1961

ECS 301/EPS 301

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

Co-taught by Professors Daniel Hoffman-Schwartz (Comparative Literature) and Anson Rabinbach (History), and drawing on the expertise of distinguished Princeton faculty and visitors, this seminar aims to provide a broad, multidiciplinary perspective on turning points in European culture from the early modern period to the present. It serves as the core course for the Program in European Cultural Studies (ECS) and the Program in Contemporary European Politics and Society (EPS).

Sample reading list:
Galileo Galilei, ...

Read more about ECS 301/EPS 301

Ecstasies of Time

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014
Topics: Ecstasies of Time (3 credits)
16:470:672:01
Cross-listed with Comparative Literature 16:470:516:01 and Philosophy 16:730:536:01
Professor Michael Levine

Co-instructed by Daniel Hoffman-Schwartz
W 4:30 - 7:10pm, 172 College Avenue, Seminar Room

The course will focus primarily on Heidegger's account of “ecstatic temporality” in Being and Time but also involve considerations of Aristotle on “suddenness,” Augustine on “rapture,”...
Read more about Ecstasies of Time