Bio

I joined Princeton’s program in the Religions of Mediterranean Antiquity in 2014 after receiving a MAR in the History of Christianity from Yale University and degrees in Religious Studies and Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My interests cluster around elite Christians in the later Roman Empire, book history, legal history, and the history of epistemology.

My dissertation approaches Christianization from a new angle: not the Christianization of people, but of structures of knowledge. In it, I trace changes to documentary practice and readerly expectations across technical literature from the late fourth through the middle of the fifth century CE. I explore late antique scholarly productions ranging from Christian theological tractates and conciliar acta to Roman juristic writings and authoritative legal compendia, military handbooks, grammatical treatises, and the Palestinian Talmud in order to explore the ways that imperial Christianity inflected the production of truth even in domains that do no constructive theological work. Bishops, rabbis, and jurists in the Theodosian era produced definitive statements of sophisticated intellectual traditions with startlingly similar forms, and I argue that all are best understood as products of a considerably unified, and novel, book culture that arose in this peculiar Theodosian moment.

I am co-director of the Solomon's Pools Archaeological Project, as well as a field archaeologist with the Jezreel Valley Regional Project, where I  focus on excavation of the Roman 6th Legion “Ferrata” castra in Legio, Israel.

For the 2018-9 academic year I am in residence at the American Academy in Rome as the Paul Mellon/Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow.