I am a Ph.D candidate in Comparative Politics in the Department of Politics at Princeton University. My research focuses on the political economy of decentralisation, local government and public goods provision in dominant party states, exploring the effects of institutional structures and service provision on electoral behavior, sanctioning and regime stability. All of my work takes a mixed methods approach. I use qualitative, quantitative and formal methods to understand political processes and incentives which are difficult to identify using a single methodological approach. My regional focus is sub-Saharan Africa and I have extensive field experience in Tanzania. I am interested in the politics of opposition parties more broadly as well as nationalism and independence in Scotland.

Before starting at Princeton, I worked as a researcher for a number of development organizations including Innovations for Poverty Action, the Indigo Trust and the Gatsby Foundation. I hold a first class degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Balliol College, Oxford and an MA in Politics from Princeton University.

I am a University Fellow in the Department of Politics, an affiliate of the Research Program in Political Economy and a Graduate Fellow in the Program for Quantitative and Analytical Political Science (Q-APS), all at Princeton.